Tentaclesaurus Rex – B&W

TentacleRexBW

I’ve spent some time over the last four years trying to figure out a graphic novel project that a writer friend and I could collaborate on. I like his writing. He likes my illustration. We never did find a story that we both were willing to invest the time and money to take to completion.

At one point, while working out a possible scene in a possible plot, he asked whether I wanted the protagonist to battle a tyrannosaurus rex or a giant squid. My first thought was “Why not both?” but I think I told him that I preferred a tyrannosaur.

The “Why not both?” thought stuck with me and the “both” element had me decide to combine the two creatures into one. Sorta.

Chaugnar Faugn – Color

Chaugnar Faugn Color

“Words could not adequately convey the repulsiveness of the thing. It was endowed with a trunk and great, uneven ears, and two enormous tusks protruded from the corners of its mouth. But it was not an elephant. Indeed, its resemblance to an actual elephant was, at best, sporadic and superficial, despite certain unmistakable points of similarity. The ears were webbed and tentacled, the trunk terminated in a huge flaring disk at least a foot in diameter, and the tusks, which intertwined and interlocked at the base of the statue, were as translucent as rock crystal.”

Frank Belknap Long, “The Horror From the Hills

Chaugnar Faugn – B&W

Chaugnar Faugn BW

One of the reasons that I’m so fond of the so-called Cthulhu Mythos is its breadth and diversity. H.P. Lovecraft may have originated it but it has long since outgrown his writings. Howard Belknap Long was a writer who added to the Mythos during Lovecraft’s lifetime. His most notable creations are the Hounds of Tindalos and the fellow above, Chaugnar Faugn. All of Lovecraft’s work is in the public domain, easily found and therefore easily read. Long’s work is still under copyright and, because Long has not retained a lot of posthumous popularity, requires some effort to track down. As far as I can tell, the Seattle Library has nothing by him in its collections. As such, I haven’t read The Horror from the Hills, the story that first features Chaugnar Faugn.

But what the hell, I have read T.E.D. Klein‘s Black Man with a Horn, featuring a version of Chaugnar Faugn that only vaguely resembles the original, and I felt like drawing an eldritch abomination so … here he is.

Tails of Valor Cover Process

Last Sunday I posted my basic sketches for the individual images that I planned to have make up the cover for Tails of Valor. Here’s what I did to turn those images into the final cover illustration.

Using Photoshop I collaged the images in a variety of ways to find a balance that looked good. The version below is number seven.
TailsValorCoverRough7 Once I figured out the basic layout I did a rough sketch that combined all the images in a way that (hopefully) worked together aesthetically. Triptych Sketch Final

Next I did detailed pencils of each scene. We (the book’s editor and I) decided to have me do each scene as a separate image and then have book’s cover designer put them all together for the final product. I regularly combined my working images in order to be sure that I was getting a good balance for the final illustration.TailsValor3PanelPencils

Next I “flatted” images for coloring, meaning I separated out specific areas of each image that I wanted to be able to color individually. At this point I wasn’t necessarily choosing the final colors that I planned to use, just something close.
TailsValor3PanelFlatsTest

And then I started adding detailed colors, adjusting colors on specific layers, doing gradients and playing with different brushes. I really don’t have much to say from here on. There was trial. There was error. There was “Hey! That looks good!”

TailsValor3PanelColor2

I hopped back and forth between all the illustrations but, in the beginning, I spent most of my time on the Egypt and Rome sections.

TailsValor3PanelColor3I made my biggest post-pencil changes here by moving the jumping cat in the Rome section up in space. The change doesn’t look like much but it makes the scene livelier.
TailsValor3PanelColor4 And done. Mostly. I’ve made some tiny adjustments to parts of the illustrations since I created the jpeg below but I’m probably the only person who will notice them. TailsValor3PanelColor5

Golden Goblin Press will be kickstarting Tails of Valor in July. I’ll put a post about that when the time comes.

Tails of Valor Cover Sketches

I haven’t had a chance to finish any new illustrations for this site. I’ve been working on a cover for Tails of Valor, a collection of scenarios for the Cathulhu version of the Call of Cthulhu RPG to be published by Golden Goblin Press. There are three scenarios in the book: one set in Ancient Egypt during the time of the Pharaohs, one set in 15th century France during witch hysteria and one set in Rome at the time of Caligula. The editor asked me to create a cover that featured images from all three adventures.

Aaargh.

Multiple image covers are tricky. You’ve got to balance the images and colors so that the results are pleasing rather than just chaotic. I started by sketching an image for each scenario by itself. I figured that once I knew which basic image I would illustrate I could then figure out how to combine them in a way that looked good. EgyptSketch001

The Egypt image.FranceSketch001 The France image. RomeSketch001

The Rome image.

Come back Wednesday for a process post of the cover from pencils to final colors.

Seven Characters Without A Story – Part 2

These are the finalish character designs for this year’s abandoned graphic novel project. I say “finalish” because, until I had actually started penciling the story pages I’m sure that we would have made more adjustments. The big guy’s artificial eye’s final design was still being worked out. The uniform probably would have gotten a tweek or two.

Am I likely to ever use these designs for characters in a project of my own?

Mostly not. They were designed with a specific story in mind and so, with one exception, they’re not likely to continue living in my imagination. The one exception is the monster. I’ve gotten found of the critter. I can’t use it for any version of this story – the writer owns the plot – but I can imagine it turning up in other places.
TheGardener2 TheSoldier2SpaceSuit
TheTechnician2
TheTrainer2TheBoys2TheTarbaby2

Seven Characters Without A Story – Part 1

I had mentioned recently that I expected a chunk of my time this year to be caught up in drawing a graphic novel.

Sigh.

That time has been freed up. The writer and I have, amicably, agreed to abandon the project due to that old standby – creative differences. We were both enthusiastic about the story but, unfortunately, we were enthusiastic about different, and incompatible, versions of the story. So he’s keeping his story, perhaps to have another artist illustrate, and I’m keeping my character designs.

And since I like posting stuff on this weblog I’m showing those designs to you. Today’s post is the initial character designs. I did a number of preliminary sketches prior to these where I worked to distill the characters into individuals that I could draw multiple times from multiple angles. The uniforms that these folks are wearing didn’t survive this stage. The chest pockets looked okay on the guys but terrible on the women.
TheGardener1 TheSoldier1TheTechnician1 TheTrainer1TheBoys1TheTarbaby1

Fluffy Don’t Cuddle – B&W

FluffyOriginalBehold Fluffy, the Easter Bunny from Hell!. I did this drawing some thirty plus years ago and gave it to a friend. Last year she sent me this photo of it and I had to laugh. I’ve forgotten a lot of the drawings I’ve done but this one has stayed in my memory. It was nice to find out that it still existed.

And if the drawing is still out there, so is Fluffy himself. He just needs more children to see him and believe. The more children who believe, the more children he can visit. Fluffy doesn’t believe in good children or bad children. He hides goodies for them all. And if they’re really lucky, they’ll never find them. 
FluffyBW